In the early 2000s, there were probably no two hotter acts on the planet than Linkin Park and Eminem, and with the 8 Mile rapper's involvement in the Anger Management tour that put him on the radar of many nu metal fans, it's surprising their paths never really crossed on record. But thanks to YouTube favorite Anthony Vincent, you no longer have to wonder how that might have sounded, as the man of many voices takes care of that with his latest video, singing Eminem's "Lose Yourself" in the style of Linkin Park.

Vincent has made a name for himself over the last few years with his unique song interpretations, often singing a singular song in the styles of multiple musicians across different genres, showing his ability to adapt on the fly and morph into any sound or voice. Helping him in this latest venture is guitarist Jonathan Young, who also mixed and mastered the song and rocks Brad Delson-like headphones.

This feels like the perfect crossover as part of what made Eminem's "Lose Yourself" such a success was the angst-ridden feeling of desperation and determination that he provided, and that's something that Linkin Park captured in their sound equally well. Some of Eminem's most desperate lyrics fall perfectly within that Chester Bennington scream wheelhouse. Meanwhile, Linkin Park had their own adept wordsmith in their own right in Mike Shinoda, so the rap-styled verses aren't too much of stretch for most Linkin Park fans.

Vincent alternates well between the rap styled delivery and hones in on Bennington's highly recognizable screaming moments quite well, all while backed with glitchy guitars and synths that sound very similar to Linkin Park's breakout years.

Realizing a good thing, Vincent and Young have also made this song available on multiple platforms if you want to stream it. Be sure to head here if you'd like to add it to a playlist of your choosing.

Anthony Vincent Featuring Jonathan Young, "Lose Yourself in the Style of Linkin Park"

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